Clocking on… 

Time has been standing still in Cambridge and Kihikihi – but not for much longer.
Waipā District Council stopped winding Cambridge’s iconic clock when the town went into lockdown, and it stalled at 6.09 ever since.

Staff stopped winding the Kihikihi War Memorial Clock in 2017 as they were no longer able to safely access the clock winding mechanism. It has been 1.31 every day in Kihikihi ever since.

Acting community services manager Brad Ward said a contractor would fix the Cambridge clock on Monday 6 December.

“We are now able to book this in because of the Covid-19 Protection Framework system starting on Friday.

“They will be servicing the clock, setting the time and going over some training for the new staff members to ensure we can manage the week-to-week maintenance and running,” said Ward.

In Kihikihi, staff have been working with a specialist watch and clock repairer who has experience in the restoration of tower clocks.

The clock sits on top of the town’s war memorial building overlooking State Highway 3 and the council has allocated $70,000 for its repair in the long-term plan.

Property Services manager Bruce Nunns told the Finance and Corporate committee this week staff identified structural upgrades to the Kihikihi clock’s platforms and the installation of a fall arrest system.

Because the clock has not worked for more than four years, it requires a major service and refurbishment.

Staff will do the work in two stages: the first this month and the second stage next year.

That would include restoration and automation followed by the installation of an automatic winding system along with the supply and fitting of a time regulation device.

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